ICANN Resolutions » Consideration of Reconsideration Request 16-11: Travel Reservations SRL, Famous Four Media Limited (and its subsidiary applicant dot Hotel Limited), Fegistry LLC, Minds + Machines Group Limited, Spring McCook, LLC, and Radix FZC (and its subsidiary applic

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Consideration of Reconsideration Request 16-11: Travel Reservations SRL, Famous Four Media Limited (and its subsidiary applicant dot Hotel Limited), Fegistry LLC, Minds + Machines Group Limited, Spring McCook, LLC, and Radix FZC (and its subsidiary applic


Resolution of the ICANN Board
Meeting Date: 
周日, 27 一月 2019
Resolution Number: 
2019.01.27.23
Resolution Text: 

Whereas, Travel Reservations SRL, Fegistry LLC, Minds + Machines Group Limited, and Radix FZC (and its subsidiary applicant dotHotel Inc.) (collectively, the Requestors) submitted standard applications for .HOTEL, which was placed in a contention set with other .HOTEL applications. Another applicant, HOTEL Top-Level-Domain S.a.r.l. (HTLD), submitted a community-based application for .HOTEL.

Whereas, HTLD participated in Community Priority Evaluation (CPE) and prevailed.

Whereas, on 9 August 2016, the Board adopted Resolutions 2016.08.09.14 and 2016.08.09.15 (the 2016 Resolutions), which directed ICANN organization to move forward with the processing of the prevailing community application for the .HOTEL gTLD (HTLD's Application) submitted by HTLD.

Whereas, Requestors submitted Reconsideration Request 16-11 seeking reconsideration of the 2016 Resolutions.

Whereas, while Request 16-11 was pending, the Board directed ICANN organization to undertake a review of the CPE process (the CPE Process Review). The Board Governance Committee (BGC) determined that the pending Reconsideration Requests relating to CPEs, including Request 16-11, would be placed on hold until the CPE Process Review was completed.1

Whereas, on 13 December 2017, ICANN org published three reports on the CPE Process Review (CPE Process Review Reports).

Whereas, on 15 March 2018, the Board passed the Resolutions 2018.03.15.08 through 2018.03.15.11, which acknowledged and accepted the findings set forth in the CPE Process Review Reports, declared that the CPE Process Review was complete, concluded that, as a result of the findings in the CPE Process Review Reports, there would be no overhaul or change to the CPE process for this current round of the New gTLD Program, and directed the Board Accountability Mechanism Committee (BAMC) to move forward with consideration of the remaining Reconsideration Requests relating to the CPE process that were placed on hold pending completion of the CPE Process Review.

Whereas, in accordance with Resolutions 2018.03.15.08 through 2018.03.15.11, the BAMC invited the Requestors to make a telephonic presentation to the BAMC in support of Request 16-11, which the Requestors did on 19 July 2018. The BAMC also invited the Requestors to submit additional written materials in response to the CPE Process Review Reports.

Whereas, the BAMC has carefully considered the merits of Request 16-11 and all relevant materials and has recommended that Request 16-11 be denied because the Board adopted the 2016 Resolutions based on accurate and complete information. The BAMC also recommended the Board deny Request 16-11 because there is no evidence supporting the Requestors' claim that the Board failed to consider the purported "unfair advantage" HTLD obtained as a result of the Portal Configuration, nor is there evidence that the Board discriminated against the Requestors.

Whereas, the Board has carefully considered the BAMC's Recommendation on Request 16-11 and all relevant materials related to Request 16-11, including the Requestors' rebuttal, and the Board agrees with the BAMC's Recommendation and concludes that the rebuttal provides no additional argument or evidence to support reconsideration.

Resolved (2019.01.27.23), the Board adopts the BAMC Recommendation on Request 16-11.

Rationale for Resolution: 

Brief Summary and Recommendation
The full factual background is set forth in the BAMC Recommendation on Request 16-11 (BAMC Recommendation), which the Board has reviewed and considered, and which is incorporated here.

On 16 November 2018, the BAMC evaluated Request 16-11 and all relevant materials and recommended that the Board deny Request 16-11 because the Board adopted the 2016 Resolutions based on accurate and complete information. The BAMC also recommended the Board deny Request 16-11 because there is no evidence supporting the Requestors' claim that the Board failed to consider the purported "unfair advantage" HTLD obtained as a result of the Portal Configuration, nor is there evidence that the Board discriminated against the Requestors.

On 30 November 2018, the Requestor submitted a rebuttal to the BAMC's Recommendation (Rebuttal). The Board notes that the Rebuttal is not called for under the Bylaws applicable to Request 16-11, which are set forth in the 2016 Bylaws that were in effect Request 16-11 was filed.2 Nonetheless, the Board has considered the arguments in the Requestors' rebuttal and finds that they do not support reconsideration for the reasons set forth below.

Issue
The issues are whether the Board's adoption of the 2016 Resolutions occurred: (i) without consideration of material information; or (ii) were taken as a result of its reliance on false or inaccurate material information.

These issues are considered under the relevant standards for reconsideration requests in effect at the time that Request 16-12 was submitted. These standards are discussed in detail in the BAMC Recommendation.

Analysis and Rationale
The Board Adopted The 2016 Resolutions After Considering All Material Information And Without Reliance On False Or Inaccurate Material Information.

The Requestors suggest that reconsideration of the 2016 Resolutions is warranted because ICANN org failed to properly investigate the Portal Configuration and failed to address the alleged actions relating to the Portal Configuration. Specifically, the Requestors assert that ICANN org did not verify the affirmation by Dirk Kirschenowski, the individual whose credentials were used to access confidential information of other authorized users of the New gTLD portal, that he did not and would not provide the information he accessed to HTLD or its personnel. The BAMC concluded, and the Board agrees, that this argument does not support reconsideration because Requestors did not identify any false or misleading information that the Board relied upon, or material information that the Board failed to consider relating to the Portal Configuration in adopting the 2016 Resolutions.

First, the BAMC determined, and the Board agrees, that ICANN org undertook a careful and thorough analysis of the Portal Configuration and the issues raised by the Requestors regarding the Portal Configuration. The results of the investigation were shared with the ICANN Board, and were carefully considered by the Board in its adoption of the 2016 Resolutions. The BAMC noted that, in its investigation, ICANN org did not uncover any evidence that: (i) the information Mr. Krischenowski may have obtained as a result of the portal issue was used to support HTLD's Application; or (ii) any information obtained by Mr. Krischenowski enabled HTLD's Application to prevail in CPE. Moreover, ICANN's investigation revealed that at the time that Mr. Krischenowski accessed confidential information, he was not directly linked to HTLD's Application as an authorized contact or as a shareholder, officer, or director. Rather, Mr. Krischenowski was a 50% shareholder and managing director of HOTEL Top-Level-Domain GmbH, Berlin (GmbH Berlin), which was a minority (48.8%) shareholder of HTLD. Mr. Philipp Grabensee, the sole Managing Director of HTLD, informed ICANN org that Mr. Krischenowski was "not an employee" of HTLD, but that Mr. Krischenowski acted as a consultant for HTLD's Application at the time it was submitted in 2012. Mr. Grabenesee further verified that HTLD "only learned about [Mr. Krischenowski's access to the data] on 30 April 2015 in the context of ICANN's investigation." Mr. Grabensee stated that the business consultancy services between HTLD and Mr. Krischenowski were terminated as of 31 December 2015.3

Second, contrary to the Requestors' assertions, the BAMC determined that ICANN org did verify the affirmation from Mr. Krischenowski that he and his associates did not and would not share the confidential information that they accessed as a result of the Portal Configuration with HTLD. ICANN org also confirmed with HTLD that it did not receive any confidential information from Mr. Krischenowski or his associates obtained from the Portal Configuration. As discussed in the Rationale of the 2016 Resolutions, this information was considered by the Board in adopting the Resolutions.4 As the Board noted Rationale of the 2016 Resolutions, even if Mr. Krischenowski (or his associates) had obtained sensitive business documents belonging to the Requestors, it would not have had any impact on the CPE process for HTLD's Application. The Requestors have not explained how confidential documents belonging to the other applicants for .HOTEL could impact the CPE criteria, which do not consider other entities' confidential information. While Mr. Krischenowski's access occurred prior to the issuance of the CPE Report in June 2014, HTLD did not seek to amend its application during CPE, nor did it submit any documentation that could have been considered by the CPE panel.5 There is no evidence that the CPE Panel had any interaction at all with Mr. Krischenowski during the CPE process, and therefore there is no reason to believe that the CPE Panel ever received the confidential information that Mr. Krischenowski obtained.6

For these reasons, which are discussed in further detail in the BAMC Recommendation and incorporated herein by reference, the BAMC determined, and the Board agrees, the Requestors did not identify any false or misleading information that the Board relied upon, or material information that the Board failed to consider relating to the Portal Configuration in adopting the 2016 Resolutions. The Board's decision to allow HTLD's Application to proceed was made following a comprehensive investigation, and was well reasoned and consistent with ICANN org's Articles and Bylaws. In particular, in reaching its decision that HTLD's Application should not be excluded, the Board carefully considered the results of ICANN org's forensic review and investigation of the Portal Configuration and the Requestors' claims relating the alleged impact of Portal Configuration on the CPE of HTLD's Application.

The Board Did Not Rely Upon False Or Misleading Information In Accepting The Despegar IRP Panel's Declaration.

Although Request 16-11 challenges the Board's conduct as it relates to the 2016 Resolutions, the Requestors also appear to challenge the Board's acceptance of the Despegar IRP Panel's Declaration. In particular, the Requestors assert that "the Despegar et al. IRP Panel relied on false and inaccurate material information," such that "[w]hen the ICANN Board accepted the Despegar et al. IRP Declaration, it relied on the same false and inaccurate material information."7

As an initial matter, the Board agrees with the BAMC's conclusion that the Requestors' claim is time-barred. The Board's resolution regarding the Despegar IRP Panel's Declaration was published on 10 March 2016.8 Request 16-11 was submitted on 25 August 2016, over five months after the Board's acceptance of the Despegar IRP Panel's Declaration, and well past the then 15-day time limit to seek reconsideration of a Board action.9

The Requestors' Claims Regarding the Dot Registry and Corn Lake IRP Panel Declarations Do Not Support their Claims of Discrimination.

Even had the Requestors timely challenged the Board's resolution regarding the Despegar IRP Panel's Declaration, the Board agrees with the BAMC that the Requestors' claims do not support reconsideration. The Requestors cite to the IRP Panel Declaration issued in Dot Registry, LLC v. ICANN (Dot Registry IRP Panel Declaration) to support their claim that the Despegar IRP Panel Declaration was based "upon the false premise that the [CPE Provider's] determinations are presumptively final and are made independently by the [CPE Provider], without ICANN's active involvement."10 In particular, the Requestors claim that the Dot Registry IRP Panel Declaration demonstrates that "ICANN did have communications with the evaluators that identify the scoring of individual CPEs,"11 such that the Despegar IRP Panel relied upon false information (namely ICANN org's representation in its Response to the 2014 DIDP Request that ICANN org does not engage in communications with individual evaluators who are involved in the scoring of CPEs, which was the subject of Request 14-39), when it found ICANN org to be the prevailing party. As a result, the Requestors suggest that the ICANN Board also relied upon false information when it accepted the Despegar IRP Panel Declaration. The Requestors also argue that they are "situated similarly" to the Dot Registry claimants, and therefore if the Board refuses to grant the Requestors relief when the Board granted the Dot Registry claimants relief, then the Board is discriminating against the Requestors in contradiction to ICANN's Articles and Bylaws. The BAMC concluded, and the Board agrees, that the Dot Registry IRP Declaration and the Board's response to it, however, do not support the Requestors' request for reconsideration for the following reasons.

First, contrary to the Requestors' assertion, the Dot Registry IRP Panel did not find that ICANN org engaged in communications with CPE evaluators who were involved in the scoring of CPEs. Second, the statements made by one IRP Panel cannot be summarily applied in the context of an entirely separate, unrelated, and different IRP. The Dot Registry IRP concerned .LLC, .INC, and .LLP while the Despegar IRP concerned .HOTEL. Different issues were considered in each IRP, based on different arguments presented by different parties concerning different applications and unrelated factual situations. As such, there is no support for the Requestors' attempt to apply the findings of the Dot Registry IRP Declaration to the Despegar IRP.

Similarly, the BAMC concluded, and the Board agrees, that the Requestors' citation to the Board's acceptance of the final declaration in Corn Lake, LLC v. ICANN, (Corn Lake IRP Declaration) and decision "to extend its final review procedure to include review of Corn Lake's charity expert determination"12 does not support reconsideration. As was the case with the Dot Registry IRP, the circumstances in the Corn Lake IRP and the Board's subsequent decision concerning .CHARITY involved different facts and distinct considerations specific to the circumstances in Corn Lake's application. As such, the Board's action there does not amount to inconsistent or discriminatory treatment; it is instead an example of the way that the Board must "draw nuanced distinctions between different [gTLD] applications,"13 and is consistent with ICANN's Articles and Bylaws.

The CPE Process Review Confirms that ICANN Org did not have any Undue Influence on the CPE Provider with respect to the CPEs Conducted.

The BAMC concluded, and the Board agrees, that the Requestors' suggestion that ICANN org exerted undue influence over the CPE Provider's execution of CPE does not warrant reconsideration.14 Indeed, as the BAMC correctly pointed out, this argument has already been addressed by the Board in the 2018 Resolutions.15

In short, the CPE Process Review's Scope 1 Report confirms that "there is no evidence that ICANN org had any undue influence on the CPE Provider with respect to the CPE reports issued by the CPE Provider or engaged in any impropriety in the CPE process," including with respect to HTLD's Application.16 The Requestors believe that the Scope 1 Report demonstrates that "the CPE Provider was not independent from ICANN. Any influence by ICANN in the CPE was contrary to the policy, and therefore undue."17 The Requestors do not identify what "policy" they are referring to, but regardless, their disagreement with the conclusions of the Scope 1 Report do not support reconsideration. This is because the Requestors do not dispute that, when ICANN org provided input to the CPE Provider, that input did not involve challenging the CPE Provider's conclusions, but rather was to ensure that the CPE Reports were clear and "that the CPE Provider's conclusions"—not ICANN org's conclusions—were "supported by sufficient reasoning."18 The Requestors also cite "phone calls between ICANN and the CPE Provider to discuss 'various issues,'" claiming that those calls "demonstrate that the CPE Provider was not free from external influence from ICANN" org and was therefore not independent.19 Neither of these facts demonstrates that the CPE Provider was "not independent" or that ICANN org exerted undue influence over the CPE Provider. These types of communications instead demonstrate that ICANN org protected the CPE Provider's independence by focusing on ensuring that the CPE Provider's conclusions were clear and well-supported, rather than directing the CPE Provider to reach a particular conclusion. This argument therefore does not support reconsideration. Accordingly, the BAMC concluded, and the Board agrees, that because the Scope 1 Report demonstrates that ICANN org did not exert undue influence on the CPE Provider and CPE process, it disproves the Requestors' claim that "the Despegar et al. IRP Panel was given incomplete and misleading information" which is based solely on the premise of ICANN org's undue influence in the CPE process.20

The Requestors Have Not Demonstrated that ICANN Org was Obligated to Produce Communications Between ICANN Org and the CPE Panel.

The Board agrees with the BAMC's conclusion that reconsideration is not warranted because, as the Requestors claim, the Despegar IRP Panel did not order ICANN org to produce documents between ICANN org and the CPE Provider. The BAMC noted that that ICANN org was not ordered by the IRP Panel to produce any documents in the Despegar IRP, let alone documents that would reflect communications between ICANN org and the CPE panel. And no policy or procedure required ICANN org to voluntarily produce documents during the Despegar IRP or thereafter.21 In contrast, during the Dot Registry IRP, the Dot Registry IRP Panel ordered ICANN org to produce all documents reflecting "[c]onsideration by ICANN of the work performed by the [CPE Provider] in connection with Dot Registry's application" and "[a]cts done and decisions taken by ICANN with respect to the work performed by the [CPE Provider] in connection with Dot Registry's applications."22 ICANN org's communications with the CPE panels for .INC, .LLC, and .LLP fell within the scope of such requests, and thus were produced. Ultimately, ICANN org acted in accordance with applicable policies and procedures, including ICANN's Bylaws, in both instances.23

The Requestors Have Not Demonstrated that a New CPE of HTLD's Application is Appropriate.

Without identifying particular CPE criteria, the Requestors ask the Board to "ensure meaningful review of the CPE regarding .hotel, ensuring consistency of approach with its handling of the Dot Registry [IRP Panel Declaration]."24 The BAMC determined, and the Board agrees, that to the extent the Requestors are asserting that the outcome of the CPE analysis of HTLD's Application is inconsistent with other CPE applications, this argument was addressed in Scope 2 of the CPE Process Review. There, "FTI found no evidence that the CPE Provider's evaluation process or reports deviated in any way from the applicable guidelines; nor did FTI observe any instances where the CPE Provider applied the CPE criteria in an inconsistent manner."25 Additionally, for the reasons discussed in above and in detail in the BAMC Recommendation, the Board finds that neither the .HOTEL CPE nor the 2016 Resolutions evidence inconsistent or discriminatory treatment toward the Requestors. For these reasons, this argument does not support reconsideration.

The 2018 Resolutions Are Consistent With ICANN's Mission, Commitments, Core Values and Established ICANN Policy(ies).

The Requestors' criticisms of the 2018 Resolutions focus on the transparency, methodology, and scope of the CPE Process Review. None support reconsideration. The BAMC found, and the Board agrees, that the BAMC and the Board addressed the Requestors' concerns regarding the 2018 Resolutions in its Recommendation on Request 18-6,26 which the Board adopted on 18 July 2018.27 The rationales set forth by the BAMC, and the Board in its determination of Request 18-6, are incorporated herein by reference.

The Rebuttal Does Not Raise Arguments or Facts That Support Reconsideration.

As an initial matter, Request 16-11 was submitted pursuant to the 11 February 2016 Bylaws, see Discussion supra, which do not call for a rebuttal to the BAMC's recommendation.28 Nonetheless, the Board has considered the Requestors' Rebuttal and finds that the Requestors have not provided any additional arguments or facts supporting reconsideration.

The 11 February 2016 Bylaws Govern Request 16-11.

The Requestors assert that the Board should consider Request 16-11 under the standards for reconsideration set forth in ICANN org's 18 June 2018 Bylaws, i.e., the version of the Bylaws in effect at the time of the BAMC's recommendation, rather than the 11 February 2016 version which was in effect when Request 16-11 was submitted on 25 August 2016. However, the 18 June 2018 Bylaws did not exist when the Requestors submitted Request 16-11, and the Board did not provide for retroactive treatment when it approved the 18 June 2018 version of the Bylaws; accordingly, the 18 June 2018 Bylaws have no retroactive effect. Indeed, the Reconsideration Request form that the Requestors submitted references the standard for reconsideration under the 11 February 2016 Bylaws, instructing requestors that, for challenges to Board action, "[t]here has to be identification of material information that was in existence [at] the time of the decision and that was not considered by the Board in order to state a reconsideration request." (See Request 16-11, § 8, at Pg. 7.) Therefore, the BAMC correctly considered Request 16-11 under the 11 February 2016 Bylaws, which were in effect when the Requestors submitted Request 16-11.

The Requestors' Challenges to the Bylaws are Untimely.

The Requestors assert that "the formal requirements of Article 4(2)(q) [of the 18 June 2018 Bylaws] and the circumstances of this case create an unjustified imbalance that prevents Requestors from participating in the reconsideration proceedings in a meaningful way" because the BAMC issued a 33-page recommendation "almost four months" after the Requestors' telephonic presentation concerning Request 16-11, when (under the current Bylaws) rebuttals must be filed within 15 days after the BAMC publishes its recommendations and may not exceed 10 pages. (Rebuttal, at Pg. 1.) As noted above, the operative version of the Bylaws do not provide the Requestors with a right to submit a rebuttal, so reconsideration is not warranted on account of the Requestors' apparent disagreement with the deadlines governing rebuttals under the current (inapplicable) version of the Bylaws.29 Moreover, the Requestors have meaningfully participated in the reconsideration process: the Requestors made a presentation at a telephonic hearing concerning Request 16-11 (Rebuttal, at Pg. 1); and, as noted in the BAMC's Recommendation, the Requestors submitted—and the BAMC considered—seven letters in support of Request 16-11.30 The Requestors have now also submitted a rebuttal in support of Request 16-11, which the Board has considered. Accordingly, the Requestors have not shown that they have been prevented from "meaningful" participation in the reconsideration request process.

The Board Considered Ms. Ohlmer's Actions When it Adopted the 2016 Resolutions.

The Requestors assert that the "Board ignored the role of [Katrin] Ohlmer" (Rebuttal, at Pg. 3) in the Portal Configuration issue. The Requestors claim that Ms. Ohlmer was CEO of HTLD when she accessed the confidential information of other applicants, and that she had been CEO from the time HTLD submitted HTLD's Application until 23 March 2016. (Request 16-11, § 8, at Pg. 19; see also Rebuttal, at Pg. 3.) The Requestors claim that, because of her role at HTLD, information Ms. Ohlmer accessed "was automatically provided to HTLD." (Rebuttal, at Pg. 4.) The Requestors also assert that "HTLD acknowledged that [Ms. Ohlmer] was (i) principally responsible for representing HTLD, (ii) highly involved in the process of organizing and garnering support for [HTLD's Application], and (iii) responsible for the day-to-day business operations of HTLD."31

The Board finds that this argument does not support reconsideration as the Board did consider Ms. Olhmer's affiliation with HTLD when it adopted the 2016 Resolutions. Indeed, the Rationale for Resolutions 2016.08.09.14 – 2016.08.09.15 notes that: (1) Ms. Ohlmer was an associate of Mr. Krischenowski; (2) Ms. Ohlmer's wholly-owned company acquired the shares that Mr. Krischenowski's wholly-owned company had held in GmbH Berlin (itself a 48.8% minority shareholder of HTLD); and (3) Ms. Ohlmer (like Mr. Krischenowski) "certified to ICANN [org] that [she] would delete or destroy all information obtained, and affirmed that [she] had not used and would not use the information obtained, or convey it to any third party."32 As the BAMC noted in its Recommendation, Mr. Grabensee affirmed that GmbH Berlin would transfer its ownership interest in HTLD to another company, Afilias plc. Once this transfer occurred, Ms. Ohlmer's company would not have held an ownership interest in HTLD.33

The Requestors' Arguments Concerning HTLD's and Mr. Krischenowski's Assurances and HTLD's Relationship with Mr. Krischenowski Do Not Support Reconsideration.

The Board finds that the Requestors' arguments that the Board should not have accepted the statements from Messrs. Grabensee or Krischenowski that HTLD did not receive the confidential information from the Portal Configuration does not warrant reconsideration because the Requestors have not provided any arguments or facts that have not already been addressed by the BAMC in its Recommendation.

Similarly, the Board concludes that the Requestors' arguments that the Board failed to consider timing of HTLD's separation from Mr. Krischenowski in adopting the 2016 Resolutions does not warrant reconsideration. Contrary to the Requestors' argument, it is clear that the Board considered the timing of HTLD's separation from Mr. Krischenowski when it adopted the Resolutions. In the Rationale for the 2016 Resolutions, the Board referenced the same timing in the Rationale for the Resolutions, noting that "the business consultancy services between HTLD and Mr. Krischenowski were terminated as of 31 December 2015" and "Mr. Krischenowski stepped down as a managing director of GmbH Berlin effective 18 March 2016."34 The Requestors disagree with the Board's conclusion that the timing did not support cancelling HTLD's Application, but this disagreement, without more, is not grounds for reconsideration.

The Requestors Do Not Challenge the Application of Specific CPE Criteria to HTLD's Application

The Requestors claim that the BAMC incorrectly concluded that the Requestors "do not challenge the application of the CPE criteria to HTLD's application or a particular finding by the CPE Provider on any of the CPE criteria." (Rebuttal, at Pg. 9, citing Recommendation, at Pg. 1). However, neither Request 16-11 nor the Rebuttal identifies any of the CPE criteria nor discusses the application of specific CPE criteria to HTLD's Application. (See Request 16-11; Rebuttal.) The Requestors simply reiterate their arguments that the CPE Provider applied (unspecified) CPE criteria "inconsistent[ly] and erroneous[ly]," and that the BAMC should not have considered the CPE Process Review Reports when it made its Recommendation. (Rebuttal, at Pgs. 9-10.) The BAMC addressed these arguments in its Recommendation, and the Board adopts the BAMC's reasoning as if fully set forth herein.

For these reasons, the Board concludes that reconsideration is not warranted.

This action is within ICANN's Mission and is in the public interest as it is important to ensure that, in carrying out its Mission, ICANN is accountable to the community for operating within the Articles of Incorporation, Bylaws, and other established procedures, by having a process in place by which a person or entity materially affected by an action of the ICANN Board or Staff may request reconsideration of that action or inaction by the Board. Adopting the BAMC's Recommendation has no financial impact on ICANN and will not negatively impact the security, stability and resiliency of the domain name system.

This decision is an Organizational Administrative Function that does not require public comment.